Archive Page 2

22
Jul
11

life and loss in the shadow of the holocaust

REBECCA BOEHLING, PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND DIRECTOR OF THE DRESHER CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES

While cleaning out her mother’s closet a few years ago, Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, a professor of biology at UMBC, discovered a worn brown cardboard box covered with German writing and filled with wartime letters. Most of the letters were dated between 1938 and 1941 – after her mother had left Germany and come to the United States. Now, thanks to Rebecca Boehling and Uta Larkey, an associate professor of German studies at Goucher College, this extraordinary family story comes to life in a new book: Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust

This fascinating and deeply-moving account of Jewish family life before, during and after the Holocaust reveals how the Kaufmann-Steinberg family was pulled apart under the Nazi regime and left divided between Germany, the US and Palestine. The family’s unique eight-way correspondence across two generations brings into sharp focus the dilemma of Jews in Nazi Germany facing the painful decision of when and if they should leave the country.

Published by Cambridge University Press.

27
Jun
11

quality assisted living

LESLIE MORGAN, PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY

Looking for a high quality assisted living facility can be a stressful experience for older adults and their families. The challenge starts when we ask, “What is high quality?” Dr. Leslie Morgan suggests a more helpful question: “What facility would best meet the individual personality and needs of my loved one?”

“Quality Assisted Living” provides results from a study on perceptions of what constitutes quality of life in assisted living facilities, funded by the National Institute on Aging. In this video, Morgan explains how her research team completed in-depth interviews with residents, staff and family members to tease apart the notion of “quality.” The book they’ve delivered is a down-to-earth, accessible discussion of topics ranging from dining preferences to housing regulations to financial issues, in residents’ own words.

Morgan is a professor of sociology at UMBC and a researcher with UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies. For more information on “Quality Assisted Living” see the book’s official website.

10
Jun
11

edication rethunk

LEE BOOT, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF THE IMAGING RESEARCH CENTER

Lee Boot, associate director of UMBC’s Imaging Research Center, has been producing a series of videos entitled “Education Rethunk,” which deconstructs the education problem in the US by looking at it through the lens of culture.

Boot produced the videos for What Weekly and the blog WhoWeAm, which is a project of the Imaging Research Center seeking to discover who we are as individuals and as the collection of cultures that make our city, region and country.

Part One of the series, “Schools Unhinged,” features Diane Lee, vice provost and dean for undergraduate education at UMBC.

Other videos in the series:
Education Rethunk, Part 2: Edu-culture
Education Rethunk, Part 3: Ad-ucation
Education Rethunk, Part 4: Dusting Off Our Game

More videos will be posted as they become available.

02
May
11

civil marriage and civic engagement

JODI KELBER-KAYE, LECTURER IN GENDER AND WOMEN’S STUDIES

When Maryland’s state legislature sent the Civil Marriage Protection Act back to committee in March, both supporters and opponents of the bill were left with a lot of questions. In this video interview by the student journalists of the USDemocrazy news blog, with support from UMBC’s Talking Heads, Jodi Kelber-Kaye discusses her concerns with how same-sex marriage legislation is addressed in the media, her own work as a marriage equality advocate, where Maryland stands in terms of LGBT representation at the state level, and next steps for the marriage bill. She also offers tips on how young people can become engaged in issues that matter to them by communicating with their state representatives.

Kelber-Kaye is a lecturer in Gender and Women’s Studies and director of the Women Involved in Learning and Leadership program at UMBC.

29
Mar
11

pratt street riots

DR. ANNE RUBIN, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY

On April 19, 1861, Baltimore was the site of the Civil War’s pratt Street Riots. Here, Anne Rubin tells the story of the riots and the first casualties of the war.

Anne Rubin, associate professor of history, is the author of A Shattered Nation: The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, 1861-1868, and, with Edward Ayers, the CD-ROM The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in The American Civil War Part I: The Eve of War, which won, among others, the E-Lincoln prize. She has authored articles and chapters in numerous Civil War books, magazines, and encyclopedias.

Rubin is now developing Sherman’s March and America, an interactive project that tells the story of the march through maps, photos, videos and voices, and writing a related book called Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and America, which will be published by UNC Press.

18
Mar
11

social media revolution

ZEYNEP TUFEKCI, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY
What role has social media played in revolutionary movements sweeping through the Middle East? UMBC sociologist Zeynep Tufekci has addressed this question in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes and on public radio and television. In this video, made in collaboration with UMBC’s student bloggers at USDemocrazy, Tufekci tackles this issue for the student audience, exploring how people in Egypt and Tunisia have used social media as tools for communication, mobilization and organization. She also addresses social media literacy and how students can move beyond TV to more effectively consume news today.

The UN Dispatch described Tufekci’s writing on Twitter and Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution as “the best, most balanced analysis of the role of social media in ousting Ben Ali.” Learn more about her work at technosociology.org.

18
Feb
11

testing for bioagents

CHRIS GEDDES, PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE OF FLUORESCENCE
Right now it can take hours, if not days, to test for bioagents such as salmonella or anthrax, complicating efforts to respond when a disease is spreading or when a letter containing suspicious white powder is found in the mail.
Technology developed by Chris Geddes and his colleagues at UMBC’s Institute of Fluorescence cuts that time to seconds. The process, called Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence, has two stages: Microwaves are used to quickly remove genetic material from a test sample. The sample is then exposed to a laser, and it glows if the bioagent is present.
The technique opens the door to rapid and inexpensive tests for a range of bioagents, and the technique has many other uses. For instance, clinical heart attack markers can be detected within seconds, raising the possibility of confirming a heart attack during an ambulance ride instead of hours later when lab results come back at the hospital.



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