Archive for the 'International Affairs' Category

22
Jul
11

life and loss in the shadow of the holocaust

REBECCA BOEHLING, PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND DIRECTOR OF THE DRESHER CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES

While cleaning out her mother’s closet a few years ago, Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, a professor of biology at UMBC, discovered a worn brown cardboard box covered with German writing and filled with wartime letters. Most of the letters were dated between 1938 and 1941 – after her mother had left Germany and come to the United States. Now, thanks to Rebecca Boehling and Uta Larkey, an associate professor of German studies at Goucher College, this extraordinary family story comes to life in a new book: Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust

This fascinating and deeply-moving account of Jewish family life before, during and after the Holocaust reveals how the Kaufmann-Steinberg family was pulled apart under the Nazi regime and left divided between Germany, the US and Palestine. The family’s unique eight-way correspondence across two generations brings into sharp focus the dilemma of Jews in Nazi Germany facing the painful decision of when and if they should leave the country.

Published by Cambridge University Press.

13
Jan
11

the costs of justice

BRIAN GRODSKY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

What motivates a new regime to pursue justice measures against previous human rights abusers, from condemnations to criminal prosecutions? What deters them?

In his new book, The Costs of Justice, Brian Grodsky (cv) draws on 250 elite interviews and media analyses from four post-communist countries to argue that transitional justice is a function of the new leadership’s capacity to provide goods and services expected by constituents.

“New leaders who come to power have to balance the desire for justice that they may have with the public’s perceptions of [their] efficacy,” Grodsky argues. In other words, politicians responsible for making sure electricity stays on, schools remain open, and the employment rate is stable “pursue justice to the degree to which they think they can get away with pursuing justice.”

This book speaks to students, scholars, human rights practitioners, activists and policymakers, helping them to understand, from a domestic perspective, how political leaders make important decisions impacting the international community.

16
Jun
09

Twitter Revolution in Iran? Tools for Tumultuous Times

SOCIOLOGY PROFESSOR ZEYNEP TUFEKCI

The massive protests in the wake of Iran’s disputed election demonstrate how many-to-many communication technologies have the potential to radically change the nature of civic participation. Iran is not the first instance where these tools have been deployed to challenge a regime – from the Philippines to Burma, from the pro-immigrant rallies in the United States organized through text-messaging to Iran where Twitter has emerged as a central information dissemination channel, people are turning to their cell phones and their computers during times of upheaval.

Repressive regimes everywhere have long depended on their monopoly over one-to-many communication –i.e., they, and only they, can broadcast– and their ability to keep their population isolated from each other and the world. However, the genie seems to be finding it easier and easier to escape from the bottle. In Iran people are coordinating protests, organizing rallies and informing each other and the rest of the world of the latest developments through Twitter, Flicker, YouTube, Blogs and Facebook. In tumultuous times, these tools provide the opportunity to focus and direct the energy and the anger of millions of people.

BIO/CONTACT

19
Dec
08

2009 Resolutions: Clean Water For the World

Sociology Professor Andrea Kalfoglou

BIO CONTACT

29
Sep
07

Anne Brodsky, Professor of Psychology

Anne Brodsky
Professor of Psychology
Director of Women’s Studies Program
Phone: 410-455-2567
Email: brodsky@umbc.edu
http://www.umbc.edu/psyc/personal/brodsky/brodsky.html
Brodsky has worked and written about the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, a humanitarian and political women’s organization that has operated clandestinely during the Taliban regime and prior to 9/11. She has traveled repeatedly to Afghanistan, Pakistan and other countries and authored the book With All Our Strength: The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan.

26
Sep
07

Devin Hagerty, Associate Professor of Political Science

Devin Hagerty
Associate Professor of Political Science
Phone: 410-455-2185
Cellphone: 202-251-4038
Email: dhagerty@umbc.edu
Hagerty’s latest research focuses on Iran’s nuclear ambition and its potential impact on security in the Middle East, South Asia, Israel and on missile defense for U.S. troops and interests in the region. He authored a chapter for the forthcoming 2008 book Nuclear Deterrence in South Asia and Beyond on the implications of a nuclear-armed Iran. Hagerty is the co-author of Fearful Symmetry: Indo-Pakistani Crises in the Shadow of Nuclear Weapons and South Asia in World Politics. He is also the editor of Asian Security, an academic journal that takes a global, interdisciplinary look at security issues in South Asia.




UMBC’s Faculty Experts Vlog

FOLLOW US ON

Latest TalkingHeads on Twitter