Author Archive for Dinah Winnick

10
May
12

training first responders

DWIGHT POLK, PARAMEDIC PROGRAM DIRECTOR, EMERGENCY HEALTH SERVICES
In this new video, Polk discusses the stress management and training needs of emergency service professionals. Learn about how he helps first responders cope with on-the-job stress and catch a glimpse of the his new book “Law Enforcement Responder,” an innovative textbook for police officers responding to emergency situations.

Unfamiliar with EHS? Check out this quick video intro on the program, which is producing a new generation of paramedics trained in holistic pre-hospital health care, including mental health. Polk says, “There is no student anywhere in the United States, as a paramedic student, that gets the clinical exposure to mental illness and behavioral emergencies that our students do.”

Also, learn why Polk is so passionate about being a teacher and adviser, guiding UMBC students to life-saving careers.

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10
Oct
11

Leslie Morgan Helps Sun Readers Find Quality Assisted Living

“When an older family member needs supportive housing, there’s often a rush to find a place with the ‘best quality,'” wrote Leslie Morgan, professor of sociology, in an October 3rd Baltimore Sun op-ed. “But what is quality?” she asked. “Do family or friends value the same things as the future assisted-living resident?”

In searching for assisted living for a family member, Morgan recommends looking beyond a facility’s cosmetic factors to attend to the individual habits, interests and needs of the person who will live there. “What are their priorities?”; “How important is flexibility in their daily routine?”; “What about continuing lifelong behaviors, like having a drink before dinner, attending religious services or spending time outdoors?”

To learn more, read “Questions to Ask Before Choosing Assisted Living” or watch Morgan’s Talking Heads video. See also Morgan’s recent Washington Post letter “The unsung heroes of elder care.” Leslie Morgan is UMBC’s Lipitz Professor of the arts, humanities and social sciences for academic year 2011-2012 and one of the nation’s foremost scholars on aging.

27
Jun
11

quality assisted living

LESLIE MORGAN, PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY

Looking for a high quality assisted living facility can be a stressful experience for older adults and their families. The challenge starts when we ask, “What is high quality?” Dr. Leslie Morgan suggests a more helpful question: “What facility would best meet the individual personality and needs of my loved one?”

“Quality Assisted Living” provides results from a study on perceptions of what constitutes quality of life in assisted living facilities, funded by the National Institute on Aging. In this video, Morgan explains how her research team completed in-depth interviews with residents, staff and family members to tease apart the notion of “quality.” The book they’ve delivered is a down-to-earth, accessible discussion of topics ranging from dining preferences to housing regulations to financial issues, in residents’ own words.

Morgan is a professor of sociology at UMBC and a researcher with UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies. For more information on “Quality Assisted Living” see the book’s official website.

02
May
11

civil marriage and civic engagement

JODI KELBER-KAYE, LECTURER IN GENDER AND WOMEN’S STUDIES

When Maryland’s state legislature sent the Civil Marriage Protection Act back to committee in March, both supporters and opponents of the bill were left with a lot of questions. In this video interview by the student journalists of the USDemocrazy news blog, with support from UMBC’s Talking Heads, Jodi Kelber-Kaye discusses her concerns with how same-sex marriage legislation is addressed in the media, her own work as a marriage equality advocate, where Maryland stands in terms of LGBT representation at the state level, and next steps for the marriage bill. She also offers tips on how young people can become engaged in issues that matter to them by communicating with their state representatives.

Kelber-Kaye is a lecturer in Gender and Women’s Studies and director of the Women Involved in Learning and Leadership program at UMBC.

18
Mar
11

social media revolution

ZEYNEP TUFEKCI, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY
What role has social media played in revolutionary movements sweeping through the Middle East? UMBC sociologist Zeynep Tufekci has addressed this question in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes and on public radio and television. In this video, made in collaboration with UMBC’s student bloggers at USDemocrazy, Tufekci tackles this issue for the student audience, exploring how people in Egypt and Tunisia have used social media as tools for communication, mobilization and organization. She also addresses social media literacy and how students can move beyond TV to more effectively consume news today.

The UN Dispatch described Tufekci’s writing on Twitter and Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution as “the best, most balanced analysis of the role of social media in ousting Ben Ali.” Learn more about her work at technosociology.org.

13
Jan
11

the costs of justice

BRIAN GRODSKY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

What motivates a new regime to pursue justice measures against previous human rights abusers, from condemnations to criminal prosecutions? What deters them?

In his new book, The Costs of Justice, Brian Grodsky (cv) draws on 250 elite interviews and media analyses from four post-communist countries to argue that transitional justice is a function of the new leadership’s capacity to provide goods and services expected by constituents.

“New leaders who come to power have to balance the desire for justice that they may have with the public’s perceptions of [their] efficacy,” Grodsky argues. In other words, politicians responsible for making sure electricity stays on, schools remain open, and the employment rate is stable “pursue justice to the degree to which they think they can get away with pursuing justice.”

This book speaks to students, scholars, human rights practitioners, activists and policymakers, helping them to understand, from a domestic perspective, how political leaders make important decisions impacting the international community.

18
Nov
10

mothering as everyday practice

BAMBI CHAPIN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY

What makes a good mother? Bambi Chapin has co-edited (with Kathleen Barlow) a new special issue of the journal Ethos on “Mothering as Everyday Practice.” The articles explore not just what mothers say about parenting, but what they actually do, and how they understand what defines a good mother. These ideas are far from natural or universal. Instead, they are informed by a diversity of value systems, social structures, traditions, habits and life circumstances.

Chapin undertook the research that inspired this publication while parenting her own child in the field, and she describes how others’ reactions to her mothering shaped her field relationships in unexpected ways. Likewise, her personal reactions to others’ mother-child interactions—feeling surprise or dismay—often prompted her most notable insights.

Bambi Chapin is co-editor of the December 2010 issue of Ethos on “Mothering as Everyday Practice.”




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